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Power of the Word International Conference VI
1 - 4 July 2020, The Loyola Institute, Trinity College Dublin Ireland
Anticipated conference fee EUR 150 (with Early Bird offer of EUR 120) will include registration to all days as well as refreshments throughout. Bookings to open in early December.

The Call of Literature:

Theology, Philosophy and Literature in Conversation

Confirmed keynote speakers for the 2020 conference include: 

Marta Gibińska (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)

Daniel Hadas (King's College, University of London, UK)

Garry L. Hagberg (Bard College, New York, USA)

David Jasper (University of Glasgow, UK)

Declan Kiberd (University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA and Dublin, Ireland)

Jean-Pierre Sonnet SJ (Gregorian University, Rome, Italy)

Abraham B. Yehoshua (University of Haifa, Israel)

The Conference will also include a poetry-reading event with Prof. Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin,the current Ireland Professor of Poetry.

The sixth Power of the Word Conference will explore aspects of the ‘call of literature’, for authors and audiences alike. 

How do writers and critics understand it? What does it mean to speak of a ‘vocation’ to write and what have theologians and philosophers got to say on the matter? In what sense can we speak of readers being called to literature? 

However we might resolve these questions, we are still left with a profound problem. Is the spirit of literature necessarily an ‘angel of light’? Or does the call of literature sometimes prove to be a siren song? 

Reading is ‘dangerous’, wrote Marcel Proust, when, ‘rather than waking us to the inner life of our soul, it tends to take its place’ (Sur la lecture,1906).The many different ways that we experience literature, as authors or readers, invite questions about discernment, authenticity, truth, beauty and much else besides. 

The conference aims to explore, without geographical or chronological restrictions, the ‘call of literature’, the problems of discernment that it introduces for literary authors and their readers, and philosophers’, theologians’ and critics’ recourse to the literary.